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GEN videos are informative, entertaining, and encompass all aspects of biotechnology.

Experience Changes Biology

New study concludes that the cell is a machine for turning experience into biology.

  • Experience Changes Biology

    New study concludes that the cell is a machine for turning experience into biology.

  • How Epigenetics Controls Behavior

    Researchers Shelley Berger and Daniel Simola describe how they used epigenetics to change the behavior of ants. Ants have a structured workforce where smaller ones, called minors, tend to forage for food; larger ants, called majors, act as soldiers.

  • How To Stop Hangovers (With Science)

    New Year’s Eve is right upon us. Here is some scientific advice on how to prevent a hangover whenever you celebrate a little too hard.

  • Can Lab-Grown Super Corals Save The Ocean?

    Coral reefs are an important part of the ecosystem, but they are struggling to survive in changing oceans. Can lab-grown super-performing corals save the seas?

  • Human Face Evolution In Last 6 Million Years

    One of our earliest ancestors, Orrorin tugenensis, lived around six million years ago in Kenya. Over this time period the human face has evolved and changed markedly.

  • Finally Proof of Global Warming

    More than 190 countries are meeting in Paris next week to create a framework for addressing climate change and to implement a process to reduce greenhouse gases over time. There are lots of indications that global warming is for real.

  • Genetically Modified Dogs: Chinese Scientists Use CRISPR to Create Muscly Freaks

    Researchers working in the Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology at the Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health claim to be the first to use genome modification to double the muscle mass of dogs.

  • 3D Printing of Brains, Veins, and Hearts

    3D printers can replicate hard, bony body parts for use as implants in personalized medicine. But printing soft, flexible, and functional biological materials that can support their own weight during the printing process has remained a challenge. Now, Carnegie Mellon University engineers offer a solution: hydrogels that provide structural support for the biological replicas as they're being created.

  • Lessons of the Brain: the Phineas Gage Case

    The story of Phineas Gage illustrates some of the first medical knowledge gained on the relationship between personality and the functioning of the brain's frontal lobe. A construction foreman from Vermont, Gage survived an accident while laying railroad tracks, during which a 13-pound tamping iron blew straight through his head. Gage’s skull, along with the tamping iron that bore through it, are conserved at the Warren Anatomical Museum, which is a part of the Center for the History of Medicine in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine at Harvard. 

  • Ultrasound Drug Delivery

    Researchers at MIT are using ultrasound waves to enable the rapid delivery of drugs to the gastrointestinal tract. This approach could make it easier to administer therapeutics to patients suffering from GI disorders.

  • The Science of Addiction

    Addiction is a biological-based process where the brain plays the critical role. Addictive behavior can translate into positive or negative responses depending on the source of the addictive stimulus. A set of complex reactions is involved in the neurological pathways underlying addiction.

  • Cellular Reception: Engineering Tissues to Rebuild Bodies

    Regenerating new organs and tissues is one of the “hottest” and most rapidly growing areas of biotechnology research. Tissue engineers around the globe are employing techniques such as are tissue scaffolding, 3D printing, and organ-on-a-chip technology.

  • KINESIN - 3D Animation

    One of the main jobs of a cell is to transport a variety of molecules. Kinesin, a motor protein found in eukaryotic cells, takes organelles and vesicles from the center to the outside of the cell. As this 3D animation vividly illustrates, kinesins, which are powered by the hydrolysis of ATP, move their cargo along microtuble filaments within the cell.

  • Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy

    Tumor cells are sensed and destroyed by cells of the immune system and they can evolve to evade immune-mediated elimination. Scientists are developing new immunotherapies that help the immune system to "fight back" — the animation created by Nature Reviews Cancer and Nature Reviews Immunology explains how these exciting new drugs work.

  • New Insights Into "The Mind's Eye"

    SciShow explores a newly identified neurological condition, aphantasia, the inability to visualize things in your imagination, and gives tribute to Dr. Oliver Sacks, popular explorer of the human mind.

  • Women in Science Video Project: Synthetic Biology Research

    Researchers at NASA Ames Research Center are using synthetic biology to make things “work better”. Check out this informative video created by young female cinematographers. 

  • Hopkins Undergrads' Device Could Save Billions In Health Care Costs

    Team Aezon -- composed entirely of Johns Hopkins undergrads -- is a top 10 finalist for the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, a $10 million global competition to develop a portable, medical diagnostic device for the consumer market, inspired by the “tricorder” used on Star Trek. This device could help reduce the estimated $38 million wasted annually in unnecessary emergency department visits, says Kenney Scholar Ryan Walter, Engr '16, who cites research from the New England Healthcare Institute and Truven Health Analytics.

  • From Mammoths to Neandertals, Ancient DNA Unlocks the Mysteries of the Past

    Evolutionary biologist Beth Shapiro and her team extract DNA from animal bones buried in the frozen Arctic for millennia. Starting with mere fragments of DNA, the scientists can reconstruct entire genomes of these animals to better understand how species respond to rapid changes in the environment.

  • DNA Nanoswitch for Gel-Based Interaction Analysis

    Gel electrophoresis sorts DNA or other small proteins by size and shape using electrical currents to move molecules through small pores in gel. The process can be combined with novel DNA nanoswitches, developed by Wyss Associate Faculty member Wesley Wong, to allow for the simple and inexpensive investigation of life's most powerful molecular interactions.

  • Neuroscience: Crammed with Connections

    In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.