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GEN videos are informative, entertaining, and encompass all aspects of biotechnology.

Cancer Close-Up: Single-Cell Approach Provides Detailed Look Inside Tumors

Members of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad Institute and the Joint Center for Cancer Precision Medicine (CCPM) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Broad have embarked on an effort to use single-cell genome analysis to explore the diverse cellular environments of cancer tumors in finer detail than ever before. In this video, researchers involved in a pilot study that looked at melanoma – the most deadly form of skin cancer -- describe their methods, their findings, and their hopes for how their approach might inform patient care in the years to come.

  • Cancer Close-Up: Single-Cell Approach Provides Detailed Look Inside Tumors

    Members of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad Institute and the Joint Center for Cancer Precision Medicine (CCPM) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Broad have embarked on an effort to use single-cell genome analysis to explore the diverse cellular environments of cancer tumors in finer detail than ever before. In this video, researchers involved in a pilot study that looked at melanoma – the most deadly form of skin cancer -- describe their methods, their findings, and their hopes for how their approach might inform patient care in the years to come.

  • Does Homeopathy Work?

    The use of homeopathic remedies have gone on for nearly 200 years, but so has the progress of science. And that progress has shown us that the foundations of homeopathy are bunk.

  • The Brain Dictionary

    Where exactly are the words in your head? Scientists have created an interactive map showing which brain areas respond to hearing different words.

  • DNA: Past to Present

    GEN celebrates DNA Day with a video retelling of the still-unfolding DNA story, from early structural revelations, to innovative technologies, to life-altering applications.

  • Better Coffee through Chemistry

    Science can help you get the perfect cup of coffee. Not all coffee is the same. How you brew it, as well as the water and the beans you use, can determine your perfect cup.

  • 3D Printing an Artificial Kidney

    Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have bioprinted an implantable artificial kidney, with microchip filters and living kidney cells that will be powered by a patient’s own heart.

  • Genetic Test Aims to Improve Diabetes Diagnosis

    An inexpensive, fast, genetic test could help doctors more easily distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when diagnosing patients.

  • Why Are People Allergic to Peanuts?

    Eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich could be potentially fatal for 1 to 2 percent of the global population. What makes peanut allergies so lethal, and why is the number of peanut-allergy sufferers on the rise?

  • Earlier Neanderthal Presence in Europe

    An analysis of ancient DNA suggests Neanderthals were living in northern Spain around 430,000 years ago. The finding pushes the previous assumptions of Neanderthal presence in Europe by at least 30,000 years.

  • How Bacteria Make a Grappling Hook for Propulsion

    Many bacteria, including important pathogens, move by projecting grappling-hook-like extensions called type IV pili from their cell bodies. After these pili attach to other cells or objects in their environment, the bacteria retract the pili to pull themselves forward.

  • Teeth Reveal the Secrets of Human Evolution in Latest Research

    New research led by scientists at Monash University has shown how by studying teeth of our ancestors can reveal some of the secrets of human evolution.

  • What Bats Might Reveal About Your Brain

    Researchers think a bat's brain might give us clues on how human brains are able to decide on which particular sounds are deserving of their attention.

  • The World of Chocolate

    Students at Johns Hopkins University are getting a close up look at chocolate to better understand materials science.

  • A Closer Look at the Molecule That Gives Skin Elasticity

    Through Tropoelastin's movements, it assembles to make elastic fibers, tubes and sheets for tissue repair. It is used to make and fix many different elastic tissues in the body. This material relates to the paper titled, 'Subtle balance of tropoelastin molecular shape and flexibility regulates dynamics and hierarchical assembly. [Weiss Lab, University of Sydney]

  • How Humans Might Survive Climate Change

    Paleoanthropologist Dr. Matthew Skinner predicts how the human body will evolve in future habitat scenarios.

  • 5,300-Year-Old Ötzi the Iceman’s Gut Microbes

    Frank Maixner, a microbiologist at the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman in Italy, explains the significance of the gut microbes of the Ötzi the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old mummy found frozen in a European glacier in 1991. When they tested the contents of his stomach, scientists found Helicobacter pylori, an age-old bacterium that evolved differently according geographic region.

  • The Beautiful, Invisible World of Microbes

    Check out this video compilation of the 2015 Nikon small world in motion competition winners that shows our beautiful, and often time ruthless, microscopic universe.

  • Experience Changes Biology

    New study concludes that the cell is a machine for turning experience into biology.

  • How Epigenetics Controls Behavior

    Researchers Shelley Berger and Daniel Simola describe how they used epigenetics to change the behavior of ants. Ants have a structured workforce where smaller ones, called minors, tend to forage for food; larger ants, called majors, act as soldiers.

  • How To Stop Hangovers (With Science)

    New Year’s Eve is right upon us. Here is some scientific advice on how to prevent a hangover whenever you celebrate a little too hard.