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GEN videos are informative, entertaining, and encompass all aspects of biotechnology.

Ultra-Long-Term Drug Delivery

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new drug capsule that remains in the stomach for up to two weeks after being swallowed, gradually releasing its drug payload. This type of drug delivery could potentially assist in eliminating diseases such as malaria.

  • Ultra-Long-Term Drug Delivery

    Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new drug capsule that remains in the stomach for up to two weeks after being swallowed, gradually releasing its drug payload. This type of drug delivery could potentially assist in eliminating diseases such as malaria.

  • Building Better Nanodiscs

    Harvard Medical School researchers have improved the design of tiny nanodiscs, which are synthetic models of cell membranes used to study proteins that control what enters and leaves a cell. The enhancements provide an unprecedented view of how viruses infect cells.

  • Solving the Mystery of a Swimming Parasite

    Bioengineers at Stanford combined live observation, mathematical insights and robots to reveal the movement of parasitic larvae that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting millions of people worldwide.

  • Mitochondrial Diseases

    Mitochondrial diseases are a group of disorders caused by genetic mutations. In this animation, find out how these diseases arise and how new techniques can stop them being passed on from mother to child.

  • 5 Tips for a Better Thanksgiving through Chemistry

    Thanksgiving is a holiday packed with cherished family traditions. But there's always room to experiment, right? This video features five tips for a better Thanksgiving through chemistry.

  • Thanksgiving Dinner Science - Cool Science Experiment

    Thanksgiving dinner can get a little boring unless you have a science trick or two up your sleeve to entertain your guests.

  • Smoking Human Lung Small Airway on a Chip

    Wyss Institute at Harvard University Founding Director Donald Ingber and Technology Development Fellow Kambez Benam explain how the integrated smoking device mimics normal cigarette smoke exposure and how it can impact research into the causes of COPD and into new biomarkers and therapeutics. 

  • Brain Matters

    How do we learn about our environment from the experiences of others? What circuits in the brain prompt us to avoid something bad, or drive us toward something good? Stephen A. Allsop Ph.D. ’16, a student in the Harvard-MIT M.D./Ph.D. Program, studies social cognition and aims to answer these questions.

  • Monkeys Can Make Stone Tools Too

    Stone flakes made by capuchin monkeys look remarkably similar to stone tools made by early humans 2-3 million years ago, raising questions about the archaeological record.

  • CRISPR-Cas9 ("Mr. Sandman" Parody)

    Pat Ballard wrote “Mr. Sandman," which was subsequently recorded by a group known as the The Chordettes. It topped the charts for seven weeks in 1954 and turned out to be their first hit.

  • Where To Put the Next Billion People

    The world's population is set to increase by one billion by 2030. Where on Earth are they all going to live?

  • Optical Defibrillation

    Light tames lethal heart disorders in mice and virtual humans. In lab tests, researchers halt arrhythmias with gentle beams, not harsh electric shocks.

  • Climate Drivers of Early Human Migration

    A new study in Nature by Axel Timmermann and Tobias Friedrich combines models of climate variations with human migration models to find new estimates for the timing of migration waves of early Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  • Elephant Tranquilizer Might Be Exacerbating Heroin Epidemic

    Carfentanil is designed to knock out animals like elephants and moose, but drug dealers are lacing heroin with it. 

  • Genetically Modified Humans? CRISPR/Cas 9 Explained

    Fans of Blade Runner have already caught a glimpse of world with super-powered humans secretly living among us, capable of physical feats.

  • If You Edit Genes Using CRISPR, Can You Undo the Effects?

    CRISPR can be used to alter the genes of not only one organism, but an entire species, through a method of inheritance known as a gene drive. But what happens if something goes awry?

  • Zebra Finch Parents Tell Eggs: “It's Hot Outside”

    By calling to their eggs, zebra finch parents may be helping their young prepare for a hotter world brought on by climate change.

  • The Science of Steroids: Keeping The Olympics Fair

    Recent news of Olympic doping scandals have led to strict penalties and a closer look at steroid testing. Chemistry plays a huge role on both sides of the performance-enhancing drug battle. On one side are officials and scientists, aiming to keep the competitions fair; on the other are underground or overseas chemists, creating new drugs to cheat the system. This week, Reactions goes into the science of steroids -- what they are, what they do and how scientists test for them.

  • The Protein Folding Revolution

    Big leaps in our understanding of protein folding can open doors to new protein-based medicines and materials—designed from the ground up.

  • Talking Backwards

    Scientific studies have linked the ability to speak backwards with working memory through genetic mutation.