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Insight & Intelligence™ : Jan 15, 2014 (Vol. 34, No. 2)

GEN’s List of Top Pharma and Biotech Firms

Product Launches Serve as Key Factors in Determining Who Stands Where in Rankings

GEN’s list of the top 15 pharma companies and top 25 biotech companies has been updated for 2014.

The latest top pharma company list features all 15 of the companies that made the last-published GEN List on the topic—although inevitably some of the companies have shifted positions as investors responded to good news and bad news during the second half of 2013.

Between July and December, the lists show a perfect distribution of change in the ranks, with five pharmas climbing up the list (AstraZeneca, AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co., and Roche); another five slipping a notch or more (Bayer, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Pfizer, and Sanofi); and the remaining five ranked the same as last year (Astellas, Daiichi Sankyo, Glaxo-SmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, and Takeda).

GEN’s top 25 biotech company list changed more dramatically with the addition of a few companies as a result of successful drug launches.

One key difference from the July list: The minimum market cap of GEN top 25 biotech companies is $4.5 billion, nearly double the minimum of companies on the July list—reflecting a spike in investor interest in biotechs seen in the more than 50 companies that successfully completed initial public offerings during 2013.

Two companies appearing on the July list have been removed following their being acquired in deals completed since then: Amgen snapped up Onyx Pharmaceuticals (#17 on the July list) for $9.7 billion, while Perrigo completed its $8.6 billion acquisition of Elan (#15 in July) on December 18. The following day, one new company on this updated list, #19-ranked Jazz Pharmaceuticals, said it intended to acquire Gentium for about $1 billion, a deal likely to vault Jazz even higher on future editions of this list.

Companies in both lists are ranked by their market capitalization as of December 19 as furnished by the exchanges on which they trade their shares, or by other publicly available sources, such as any of several free stock information websites. Figures of non-U.S. companies were converted to U.S. dollars from various currencies.