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Aug 12, 2013

Nuevolution, HHMI, Lexicon, and Duke Form GPCR-Focused Collaboration

  • Nuevolution has entered into a scientific collaboration with Duke University, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals for the investigation of the biological mechanism of action of a specified G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug target. 

    During the scientific collaboration, Nuevolution will provide access to its Chemetics® technology for small molecule drug discovery, and both Nuevolution and Lexicon will provide access to selected chemical libraries created using the Chemetics technology. Within the framework of the collaboration, hundreds of millions of diverse small molecules will be screened to discover compounds with certain novel properties against the GPCR drug target.

    “We have used the Chemetics technology successfully to identify novel chemotypes for our internal programs and are enthusiastic about exploring the utility of our DNA-tagged libraries of diverse chemical compounds in the screening of GPCRs,” Brian P. Zambrowicz, Ph.D., evp and CSO of Lexicon, said in a statement.

    The principal investigator for Duke University and the HHMI is Robert J. Lefkowitz, James B. Duke professor of medicine and of biochemistry at Duke University Medical Center, HHMI employee, and Nobel Laureate in Chemistry 2012.


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