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Jan 17, 2013

NanoSmart, UCLA Team Up to Battle Pediatric Cancer

  • NanoSmart Pharmaceuticals and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) are collaborating to continue the development of NanoSmart’s drug delivery platform for the treatment of cancer and other life-threatening diseases.

    NanoSmart’s platform drug delivery system utilizes human autoimmune antibodies that can target different types of tumors. When combined with cancer drugs, this technology, according to the firm, allows for the creation of a range of next-generation, safer, and more effective cancer drug products.

    “Despite the extensive research into new drug formulations, the pace of advancing benefit to this patient population is unfortunately slowing,” said Noah Federman, M.D., director of the Pediatric Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma Program at UCLA, a part of the UCLA Sarcoma Program and UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center; and assistant professor of pediatrics, hematology/oncology at Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA. “We are pleased to collaborate with NanoSmart to help drive the development of these much-needed products.”

    NanoSmart began development of their drug delivery platform in September of 2011; just two months later, they entered into a research collaboration with Children's Hospital Los Angeles to develop and assess the platform.


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