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Sep 19, 2012

Illumina Acquires Genetic Abnormality Screening Firm

  • Illumina acquired BlueGnome, a U.K. firm that provides products for screening for genetic abnormalities associated with developmental delay, cancer, and infertility. Founded in 2002, BlueGnome introduced its CytoChip genetic test for genetic abnormalities in 2006, and in 2008 introduced its 24sure assay for screening for chromosomal aneupoidy in single cells, which was developed in collaboration with leading IVF centers around the world. The firm claims CytoChip is now used in hundreds of laboratories globally as a first-line cytogenetic test that replaces traditional G-band karyotyping, primarily for abnormalities associated with developmental delay or complex leukemias.

    BlueGnome will operate as a wholly owned subisidary of Illumina. “The BlueGnome acquisition supports Illumina’s goal to be the leader in genomic-based diagnostics and enhances the company’s ability to establish integrated solutions in reproductive health and cancer,” comments Jay Flatley, Illumina president and CEO. BlueGnome claims becoming part of Illumina will offer new opportunities for genetic testing. “By joining forces with Illumina, we will be able to leverage the industry’s leading microarray and sequencing platforms for our next-generation products,” states Nick Haan, president and CEO at the U.K. firm.


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