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Mar 27, 2007

Eli Lilly Launches $150M Expansion in Singapore

  • Eli Lilly and Company will make a $150-million expansion to its drug discovery research activities in Singapore. The Lilly Centre for Systems Biology (LSB) will undergo changes over the next five years. The project, a partnership with the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), will take advantage of local biomedical expertise and, potentially, fuel translational medicine growth in Singapore.

    “Our expansion at Lilly’s facility is significant in that it confirms the success we have had here in Singapore in our biomarker research and the development of information technology tools that support our discovery biology efforts,” remarks Steven Paul, M.D., executive vp of science and technology. “It is also important because the research that we conduct here in Singapore supports Lilly’s aggressive drug discovery program worldwide.”

    Lilly established the Lilly-NUS Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, a joint venture with the National University of Singapore and the EDB, in 1996. This Phase I clinical pharmacology unit is now a fully owned Lilly facility, and provides a substantial portion of the clinical pharmacology capacity for Lilly.

    The growing facility will be renamed the  Lilly-Singapore Centre for Drug Discovery and build on Lilly’s existing capabilities in biomarker discovery and development, primarily in cancer research. New drug discovery capabilities will be developed in cancer and metabolism. Other areas of focus will include epigenetic biology, adult stem cell biology, disease state modeling, and computational sciences.



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