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Dec 17, 2013

Biogen Idec, Samsung Bioepis to Commercialize Anti-TNF Biosimilars in Europe

  • Biogen Idec is entering an agreement to commercialize anti-TNF biosimilar product candidates in Europe, including biosimilars for therapies to treat rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s disease, through its joint venture with Samsung Biologics, Samsung Bioepis.

    Per the agreement, Biogen Idec will be responsible for commercialization of these product candidates across Europe. According to the company, the deal with Samsung Bioepis aligns with Biogen Idec’s broader corporate objectives of remaining focused on its core business, while leveraging its expertise in manufacturing and specialty markets to meet the need for biosimilar therapies.

    “This is a unique opportunity for us to leverage our experience in developing and manufacturing high-quality biologics in therapeutic areas where we are deeply focused, and provide medicines to patients where there is a significant societal need,” said Tony Kingsley, evp of global commercial operations at Biogen Idec.

    “Samsung Bioepis has established a global commercialization plan for its antibody drugs currently under development, and we believe this agreement will further serve as a solid foundation for Samsung Bioepis to develop into a worldwide biosimilar leader,” said Christopher Hansung Ko, Ph.D., the joint venture's CEO.

    Samsung made its first big biotech play in February when Merck entered into an agreement with Samsung Bioepis to develop and commercialize multiple prespecified and undisclosed biosimilar candidates.



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