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Nov 26, 2012

Activiomics Inks Cell Signaling Research Agreement

  • Activiomics signed a research agreement with the Japanese pharmaceutical company Kyowa Hakko Kirin to apply its TIQUAS phosphoproteomics platform to elucidate signaling mechanisms of lead compounds in relevant cell-based systems. This agreement was signed as part of Activiomics’ strategic partnership with BioFocus, which was forged back in July.

    Activiomics, a privately owned spin-out company from the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), uses its mass spectrometry-based methods to analyze and interpret cell-signaling pathway activity, generating information for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. TIQUAS (Targeted Quantification of Cell Signaling), according to Activiomics, can quantify global kinase activity without the need for labeling or antibody isolation and also profile and cross-compare phosphopeptides.

    “We’ve engaged with Activiomics because we recognize that Activiomics’ label-free phosphoproteomics approach can provide unique insights into signalling pathway activity, information that can complement and extend our existing gene expression datasets. This technology will enable us to better understand cell signaling mechanisms of our lead compounds and could enable us to identify important biomarkers,” said Etsuo Ohshima, Ph.D., managing officer and vice president, head, research division at Kyowa Hakko Kirin.


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